100 CSKD http://100cskd.com/ Sun, 25 Sep 2022 13:24:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://100cskd.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png 100 CSKD http://100cskd.com/ 32 32 Exclusive: Italy and Intel choose Veneto as the preferred region for their new chip factory https://100cskd.com/exclusive-italy-and-intel-choose-veneto-as-the-preferred-region-for-their-new-chip-factory/ Sun, 25 Sep 2022 10:57:00 +0000 https://100cskd.com/exclusive-italy-and-intel-choose-veneto-as-the-preferred-region-for-their-new-chip-factory/

The Intel Corporation logo is seen in a temporary office during the 2022 World Economic Forum (WEF) in the alpine resort of Davos, Switzerland May 25, 2022. REUTERS/Arnd Wiegmann/File Photo

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  • Intel to Build Advanced Packaging and Assembly Site in Italy
  • Draghi’s successor will have a say before any deal is finalized
  • Italian plant would create up to 5,000 jobs, Intel says

ROME, Sept 25 (Reuters) – The outgoing government of Mario Draghi and Intel (INTC.O) have chosen the northeastern Veneto town of Vigasio as the preferred site for a new multi-billion chip factory. euros in Italy, two people familiar with the matter said.

Intel’s investment in Italy is part of a broader plan announced by the US chipmaker last March to invest up to 80 billion euros ($77.5 billion) over the next decade. in capacity building across Europe. Read more

With an initial investment of around 4.5 billion euros which is expected to increase over time, Intel said the Italian factory will create 1,500 jobs as well as 3,500 additional jobs at suppliers and partners, with operations set to start. between 2025 and 2027.

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The Italian factory would be a state-of-the-art semiconductor packaging and assembly plant, using new technologies to assemble complete chips from tiles.

Asking not to be named due to the sensitivity of the issue, the sources said the parties detailed a comprehensive agreement in early September, but that no public announcement would be made until Sunday’s general election result.

An Intel spokesperson did not comment as negotiations are ongoing and confidential. Draghi’s office also declined to comment.

Located near Verona, on the strategic Brenner highway and railway, Vigasio is the preferred option from a shortlist of two locations, including one in the northwestern Piedmont region.

Among other reasons, the site is well connected with Germany and in particular with the city of Magdeburg, where Intel will build two factories, added one of the sources.

Intel and the government had also initially considered sites in the regions of Lombardy, Puglia and Sicily.

Draghi’s close aides aim to enter into behind-the-scenes negotiations with their likely successors to avoid any risk that the deal will be challenged by Italy’s new government, the sources said, adding that the choice of site was politically very sensitive.

Opinion polls have all predicted Giorgia Meloni’s nationalist Brothers of Italy group will become the top party on Sunday and share power with its allies the League, led by Matteo Salvini, and Silvio Berlusconi’s Forza Italia.

The sources declined to provide further details, but Reuters previously reported that Rome was ready to finance up to 40% of Intel’s total investment in Italy.

The state’s contribution to Intel’s investment program must necessarily be shared with the next government before a deal is finally formalized, one of the sources said, adding that Draghi could let the next government make the decision. ‘announcement.

To boost domestic chipmaking, Rome is also in talks with Franco-Italian STMicroelectronics, Taiwanese chipmakers MEMC Electronic Materials Inc and TSMC (2330.TW) and Israel Tower Semiconductor (TSEM.TA), which Intel has bought earlier this year.

($1 = 1.0320 euros)

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Additional reporting by Valentina Za and Elvira Pollina; edited by David Evans

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Weekend reads: How to manage your finances when inflation is high and interest rates keep climbing https://100cskd.com/weekend-reads-how-to-manage-your-finances-when-inflation-is-high-and-interest-rates-keep-climbing/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 12:13:00 +0000 https://100cskd.com/weekend-reads-how-to-manage-your-finances-when-inflation-is-high-and-interest-rates-keep-climbing/

By Philippe van Doorn

Also, a transformed housing market, inventory for this economy, and financial considerations for those working past 65

Financial markets reacted in shock to the Federal Reserve’s reinforced promise to continue tightening monetary policy to combat high inflation. The S&P 500 is down 10.5% in the past month and the average interest rate on a 30-year mortgage has fallen from 6.02% to 6.29% in a single week, according to Freddie Mac. A year ago, the average rate for a 30-year loan was 2.88%.

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell said this week that fighting inflation will be painful and he doesn’t know if tighter monetary policy will lead to a recession.

But what does all this mean for you? Andrew Keshner has tips on how to prepare for high interest rates.

Beth Pinsker explains how inflation and a possible recession can affect you as an individual.

Alessandra Malito has some suggestions for what retirees and near-retirees should do during turbulent economic times.

The accommodation has already been transformed

Freddie Mac provided startling statistics on the mortgage market, highlighting a whirlwind of opposing forces as potential home sellers and buyers are driven out of the market.

A sign of a dramatic turnaround is that in August house prices registered their biggest drop since 2011.

A slowdown in the housing finance market is particularly difficult for non-bank mortgage lenders, which began laying off staff months ago. Aarthi Swaminathan interviewed Rocket (RKT) CEO Jay Farner who outlined the steps the company is taking to stay afloat.

Don’t sell in a declining market

Conventional wisdom holds that rising interest rates are bad for stocks because bonds become more attractive as yields rise. Mark Hulbert shows why this reasonable assumption has proven wrong for long-term investors, based on decades of market data.

More Hulbert: If the market passes this test, stocks will be on course to rise

The case of energy values

Oil prices fell dramatically on Friday, accelerating the decline of West Texas Intermediate crude to just under $80 a barrel from its intraday contract high of $130.50 on March 7. Despite this decline, earnings estimates for the energy sector have been rising. That and other factors point to what may be a good case for energy stocks if you’re a long-term investor.

Another group of actions for a changing US economy

Various shortages during the coronavirus pandemic have highlighted the need for various industries to perfect their supply chains. Michael Brush lists 17 corporate stocks that can benefit from the reshoring trend.

Financial considerations for people who continue to work after age 65

Delaying retirement has an obvious advantage: you continue to be paid. But there may be other financial consequences. Here’s how working after age 65 can affect Medicare and Social Security.

To tip or not to tip… or how much to tip

Quentin Fottrell – the Moneyist – helps a couple who disagree about how much to tip their housekeeper.

Italian elections and money

Here’s how concerns over a controversial election in Italy may affect financial markets.

More from Europe: Pound and Euro tumble as Dollar Index hits highest level since mid-2002

life after retirement

When famous athletes retire from their sport, they often have plans for a new career in place. Here’s how you can prepare for your own retirement, stay alert, and be prepared if you decide to return to work.

Want to learn more about MarketWatch? Sign up for this newsletter and others, and receive the latest news, personal finance and investment advice.

-Philip van Doorn

 

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09-24-22 0813ET

Copyright (c) 2022 Dow Jones & Company, Inc.

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What to do with your remaining student loan debt https://100cskd.com/what-to-do-with-your-remaining-student-loan-debt/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 21:42:03 +0000 https://100cskd.com/what-to-do-with-your-remaining-student-loan-debt/

According to an August press release from the White House, twenty million people, or nearly 45% of federal borrowers, will see their debt wiped out by the cancellation of President Joe Biden’s student loan. However, for the 23 million borrowers who still have debt, now is the time to develop a repayment plan.

“January will be here before you know it,” says Damian Dunn, certified financial planner and vice president of corporate financial wellness platform Your Money Line.

Payments resume in January 2023. But, Dunn says, with the holidays coming up, by January, spending and borrowing time are the biggest for many people. As a result, many borrowers can be overburdened in January if they don’t plan now.

They won’t just pick up where they left off in March 2020, when payments and interest were halted. Payment amounts and options may vary.

Borrowers can expect the remaining balance of their loan to be re-amortized after cancellation. This means that their cancellation amount, either $10,000 or $20,000, will be deducted from the total they owe. Their payment term will not change, but they will receive a new monthly invoice based on the recalculation of the remaining balance. Many borrowers will see a smaller bill as a result.

Here’s what to do next.

If you work in the public service

Prioritize the achievement of Cancellation of civil service loans, or PSLF, derogation if your work makes you eligible. The Department of Education can count more payments toward the 120 needed for pardon under the waiver. This means you could see full forgiveness much sooner.

The last day to apply for the waiver is October 31.

You can still apply for the PSLF after the waiver ends, but the terms won’t be as generous.

If you are comfortable with your regular payments

If you made regular payments during the pandemic pause without financial strain, keep doing it. Continuing to pay during the pandemic means you saved money because your dollars went straight to the main balance.

However, if you haven’t made payments during the pandemic, start setting aside your payment amount now to make sure it will fit into your budget. By doing so, you could pay a three-month lump sum once payments resume.

If your student loan bill is smaller after the cancellation is applied, continue to make your original payment if you can. This way, you’ll save money on interest charges and pay off your debt faster.

Making room in your finances gives you time to adjust your budget if necessary. But you have other options if you can’t make it work.

If you need small monthly payments

If you know you’ll have trouble making your monthly payments, contact your servicer to discuss income-based reimbursement, or IDR, options. Four income-driven repayment plans currently set your payout at 10% of your Discretionary Income. Payments could be set at $0 if your income is low.

These plans also wipe out your remaining balance after 20 or 25 years.

Borrowers can also expect a new income-based reimbursement option, announced at the same time as the cancellation. The new plan will reduce the amount of income considered discretionary and halve the payout percentage to 5%. It will also reduce the forgiveness period to five years for those whose original total loan balance was $12,000 or less.

As unpaid interest continues to accumulate and capitalize under existing plans, the government will cover unpaid interest with the new IDR. That means borrowers who want to cut their monthly payments — potentially by half or more — and who don’t mind extending their repayment term could benefit the most from the new plan.

However, high-income borrowers may not see lower payments with income-driven repayment.

If you want to pay off your debt faster

If you want to pay off your debt faster and don’t want to refinance with a private lender, the best strategy is to:

  1. Stick to the standard repayment plan.

  2. Make additional payments and ask your agent to apply them to the principal of the loan.

  3. Make payments every two weeks instead of monthly payments.

Consider refinancing if you have private student loans or federal debt carrying higher rates.

With student loan refinance, borrowers replace their existing loan with a new one. Ideally, the new loan will have a lower interest rate and more favorable repayment terms.

Student loan refinance rates have increased, but borrowers with the strongest credit profiles can still find a lower rate.

Borrowers should not refinance until at least 2023 – once the cancellation is applied to their account and the interest-free forbearance is over. If you refinance, your federal student loans will become private and will no longer be eligible for federal benefits, like forgiveness and IDR.

The decision to refinance should come down to long-term financial benefit, says Clark Kendall, certified financial planner and president of Kendall Capital Management. For example, if you can go from a 7% rate to a 5% rate, you can save that 2% or increase your 401(k) contribution.

Dunn also warns borrowers to consider their risk of losing federal benefits. “I would double-check the math and make sure you’re in a better position,” he says. “Maybe a slightly lower payout doesn’t outweigh the overall benefit of having federal protections.”

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GM to invest $760 million to move Ohio plant to produce parts for electric vehicles https://100cskd.com/gm-to-invest-760-million-to-move-ohio-plant-to-produce-parts-for-electric-vehicles/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 16:37:00 +0000 https://100cskd.com/gm-to-invest-760-million-to-move-ohio-plant-to-produce-parts-for-electric-vehicles/

The new GM logo is seen on the facade of the General Motors headquarters in Detroit, Michigan, U.S., March 16, 2021. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook

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Toledo, OHIO/WASHINGTON, Sept 23 (Reuters) – General Motors Co (GM.N) said on Friday it would invest $760 million at its Toledo, Ohio plant to build drive units for electric trucks, the automaker’s first U.S. powertrain facility repurposed for electric vehicles. -related production.

America’s largest automaker currently builds GM’s six-, eight-, and ten-speed rear-wheel-drive transmissions and nine-speed front-wheel-drive transmissions in a variety of Chevrolets, Buicks, GMCs, and Cadillacs in its 2.82 million-foot squares of Toledo. , Ohio, transmission plan which he renamed Toledo Propulsion Systems.

Congress in August approved major financial incentives for automakers to convert factories producing parts for gasoline-powered vehicles to electric models.

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“Once the plant is converted, it will produce GM’s family of EV drive units, which convert electrical energy from the battery into mechanical motion at the wheels,” GM said, adding that the plant will produce transmission products while simultaneously building drive units during GM. VE transition.

The Toledo plant currently employs approximately 1,500 people. Many autoworkers have expressed concerns about the shift to electric vehicles and whether it will impact current auto employment.

“This investment helps strengthen the job security of our Toledo team for years to come and is the next step in our journey toward an all-electric future,” said Gerald Johnson, GM’s executive vice president, Global Manufacturing. and Sustainability.

GM said last year it would increase its investment in electric and autonomous vehicles from 2020 to 2025 to $35 billion, a 75% increase, as it pledges to stop selling gasoline-powered vehicles from 2020 to 2025. 2035.

GM and LG Energy Solution (373220.KS) said last month they were considering a site in Indiana for a fourth U.S. battery cell manufacturing plant for the companies’ joint venture.

Last week, GM announced it would invest $491 million in its metal stamping operations in Marion, Indiana, to prepare the plant to produce a variety of steel and aluminum stampings for future products, including electric vehicles.

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Reporting by David Shepardson and Joseph White Editing by Nick Zieminski

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Lenders Funding Announces Retirement of Harvey Friedman, Chief Operating Officer and Chief Credit Officer, and Appointment of John Benkovich https://100cskd.com/lenders-funding-announces-retirement-of-harvey-friedman-chief-operating-officer-and-chief-credit-officer-and-appointment-of-john-benkovich/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 20:22:00 +0000 https://100cskd.com/lenders-funding-announces-retirement-of-harvey-friedman-chief-operating-officer-and-chief-credit-officer-and-appointment-of-john-benkovich/

Great Elm Capital Corp.

After leading the organization’s operations and contributing dramatically to its growth and profitability as a unique specialty finance company for more than 18 years, Harvey will now serve as Vice President Emeritus while focusing on family and personal activities.

SAN DIEGO, Sept. 22, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Lenders Funding, LLC, a specialty finance company of Great Elm Capital Corp., (“we”, “us”, “our”, the “Company” or “LF ) announced today that Chief Operating Officer and Chief Credit Officer Harvey Friedman will retire after leading its credit operations and general administration for 18 years. Upon retirement, Mr. Friedman will assume the role of Vice President Emeritus. Mr. Friedman has served the factoring and asset-based lending industry for over 45 years. Prior to joining LF, Mr. Friedman was Executive Vice President and Chief Credit Officer at Gibraltar Corporation of America (“GCA”), a wholly owned subsidiary of United Jersey Bank where, for 32 years, he managed a loan portfolio $900 million guaranteed. After GCA, Mr. Friedman served as Managing Director of Sterling Bank’s Asset Based Lending division. Mr. Friedman has continually provided leadership for the entire secured lending industry, filling a void in the private finance industry for the most part. As Vice Chairman Emeritus, he will continue to contribute to the growth and success of Lenders Funding and the specialty finance business of Great Elm Capital Corp.

“Harvey is a highly regarded industry professional who has contributed immeasurably to the development and business practices of the entire factoring and asset community and in particular Lenders Funding,” said Robert Zadek, founder and CEO of Lenders Funding. “It has been an honor to see Harvey be part of the evolution of the private finance industry over the past four decades, and his knowledge, commitment and commitment have made a profound difference that will have lasting impact. Equally important are the friendship and advice he gave me, which will continue despite his retirement.

“After 18 years, it’s been a fantastic overall experience with some of the best memories of my life,” Friedman said of reflecting on his tenure at Lenders Funding. “I am especially grateful for the franchise we have created and for all the industry contacts I have had the pleasure of engaging with in all aspects of the factoring industry. My sincere thanks go out to everyone, along with my firm intention to keep in touch and potentially contribute in new ways.

“On behalf of the specialty finance family of Great Elm Capital Corp, we are very proud to have had Harvey and his veteran experience on the team,” said Michael Keller, president of Great Elm’s specialty finance group. Elm.

In light of Mr. Friedman’s retirement, John Benkovich will join LF as Chief Operating Officer and Chief Credit Officer. Mr. Benkovich has over 25 years of industry experience, most recently as President of Millennium Funding, a factoring business which was acquired by Encore Funding. At Encore, Mr. Benkovich served as Executive Vice President for Credit and Underwriting. Mr. Benkovich began his career at Norstar Bank (now Bank of America) in the investment division developing a methodology to measure and mitigate the bank’s exposure to interest rate fluctuation risk and later served as switched to commercial lending with the Bank. Mr. Benkovich holds a BA in Business Administration from St. Michaels College and an MBA from Clarkson College.

“I have known John for 25 years and have respected his management skills and secured credit insight as we worked together in the factoring industry. We are delighted that John is helping us develop lender financing and I look forward to the transactions we will manage together,” said Robert Zadek.

Michael Keller added: “John is a proven and effective COO who has the support of the LF Board to drive Lenders Funding’s growth strategy with support from all of Lenders Funding’s specialty finance businesses. Great Elm.

About Lender Financing

Lenders Funding is a private source of financing and risk sharing for factors and asset-based lenders. It buys stakes in their non-recourse transactions or provides them with working capital under various flexible programs. Since its inception, Lenders Funding has worked with over 150 lenders and factors and provided hundreds of millions of dollars in financing. Additional company information is available at www.lendersfunding.com.

About Great Elm Capital Corp.

Great Elm Capital Corp. is an externally managed business development company that seeks to generate current income and capital appreciation by investing in income-producing debt and equity securities, including investments in specialist financial businesses. Additional information can be found at www.greatelmcc.com.

Caution Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

Statements contained in this communication that are not historical facts are “forward-looking” statements within the meaning of the federal securities laws. These statements are often, but not always, made using words or phrases such as “expect”, “anticipate”, “should”, “will”, “estimate”, “design”, ” seek”, “continue”, “up”, “potential” and similar expressions. All of these forward-looking statements involve estimates and assumptions that are subject to risks, uncertainties and other factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from the results expressed in the statements. Among the key factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements are: credit market conditions, the market price of GECC common stock, the performance of GECC’s portfolio and investment manager and risks associated with the general economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on GECC and its portfolio companies. Information regarding these and other factors may be found in GECC’s Annual Report on Form 10-K and other reports filed with the SEC. GECC undertakes no obligation and expressly disclaims any obligation to update any forward-looking statements contained in this communication or to conform any prior statements to actual results or revised expectations, except as required by law. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date hereof.

Media and investor contact:
Investor Relations
investorrelations@greatelmcap.com

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Are you still waiting for the STAR check? Check your mailbox https://100cskd.com/are-you-still-waiting-for-the-star-check-check-your-mailbox/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 16:44:31 +0000 https://100cskd.com/are-you-still-waiting-for-the-star-check-check-your-mailbox/

SYRACUSE, NY (WSYR-TV) – The Your Stories team has received a few emails requesting the status of STAR credit checks.

If you’re still waiting for your check, check your mailbox because the NY Department of Taxation and Finance sent out its last batch of credits on September 16.

STAR stands for School Tax Relief. If you’re enrolled in STAR credit, the check arrives each year around the time your school tax bill is due.

For Onondaga County, tax bills are due at the end of September.

James Gazzale, a public information officer with the tax and finance department, said the goal was for STAR checks to arrive before school tax bills are due.

Gazzale said more than 650,000 STAR checks have been mailed to owners this year. He said the state was close to eclipsing last year’s total, which was about 770,000 credits.

An important note, STAR is different from the Homeowner’s Tax Credit (HTRC). The YS team has heard viewers asking where their STAR verification is and they are actually looking for the HTRC verification. Pay special attention to the check stub, it will indicate if it is HTRC or STAR.

If you have questions about your STAR credit check, you can call the Department of Taxation and Finance at 518-457-2036.

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State candidates offer ideas on surplus, housing and taxes https://100cskd.com/state-candidates-offer-ideas-on-surplus-housing-and-taxes/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 07:02:50 +0000 https://100cskd.com/state-candidates-offer-ideas-on-surplus-housing-and-taxes/


Solutions to manage Montana’s budget surplus and solve the state’s housing and child care problems were among the topics local legislative candidates discussed Tuesday at a forum hosted by the Chamber of Commerce. from Kalispell.

Candidates in the Flathead Valley Senate District 5 race agreed that the state’s estimated $1.4 billion budget surplus should go back to taxpayers, but diverted to what extent.

Republican John Fuller, a retired teacher who currently represents the House 8 district, argued that the bulk should go to taxpayers, not new government programs.

“Republicans are not opposed to spending money to improve opportunities for working families throughout Montana,” he said. “But what Republicans oppose is the redistribution of wealth.”

Meanwhile, his challenger, Democrat Kyle Waterman, called the surplus a chance to reinvest in the state “and make sure growth pays for Montana’s growth.”

Waterman, a former Kalispell City Councilman, said he was suspicious of so-called unfunded mandates after seeing a local drug addiction program left without state resources.

He called mental health care another unfunded mandate and said the state should look for ways to support Warm Springs State Hospital.

“If we don’t pay for it, we’ll pay the consequences later,” Waterman said.

Fuller said his efforts would focus on property tax relief, veterans, schools, and “protecting our children’s safety and opportunities.”

Strengthening childcare options is best left to the private sector and nonprofits, he added. He would not support pre-K funding.

“At the time, there was no shortage of child care because every child had a mother and most of them were responsible for primary child care,” Fuller said. “But modern economic reality dictates that stay-at-home parents are no longer a practical solution.”

“We the people need to take care of ourselves, the people here in Flathead County,” he added.

Waterman, who is a member of the Kalispell Chamber’s child care task force, said he would explore regulations that stand in the way of opening more day cares.

When it comes to housing, Fuller argues that the state government would only spoil solutions, which should instead come from county governments and nongovernmental organizations.

“If you expect the state of Montana to solve this problem from the top down, what will happen is that there will be a massive transfer of wealth, incredible inefficiency, and huge externalities.”

KALISPELL’S HOUSE District 7 candidates Republican Courtenay Sprunger and Democrat Angela Kennedy would both seek to pay down debt with the budget surplus.

Sprunger, however, said the majority should go to taxpayers while seeking to support “crisis areas” like the state prison and state hospital.

Kennedy said that after paying off Montana’s high-risk debt, she would review the basic needs of the state. Among these, she named affordable housing, child care, pre-kindergarten, lower property taxes, and help with addiction and mental health.

Kennedy called property tax relief for seniors a critical issue and said the state should seek other sources of revenue, such as a resort tax and taxing vacation properties at a rate higher.

Sprunger said in his door-to-door campaign that property tax relief was the main issue.

“Our tax system and the state budget are actually built on a two-legged stool,” she said, referring to property taxes and income taxes.

She said the state must be creative in reducing property taxes without sacrificing funding for education and public safety.

She agreed with Kennedy that owners of second homes and vacation rentals owned by out-of-state residents should be taxed at a higher rate.

Sprunger said the housing challenges come down to supply and demand, and the state government should “get out of the way.” The authorization process could also be streamlined, she said.

HOUSE DISTRICT 3 candidate Andrea Getts came up with a unique idea for the state surplus. The Columbia Falls Democrat said Montana could emulate North Dakota and create a state bank and reinvest profits into state programs.

She was in favor of creating low-interest loan programs for small businesses and new homeowners. As for property taxes, Getts said some type of circuit breaker cap would help.

Getts is challenging incumbent Republican Braxton Mitchell, who did not attend the forum.

Whitefish’s House District 5 Republican candidate Lyn Bennet said she would like to see the surplus returned to taxpayers. She would also be in favor of a property tax freeze.

On affordable housing, Bennet said price caps and subsidies won’t work.

“Housing could become more affordable by speeding up the permitting process, reducing impact fees, allowing AUDs and relaxing excessive zoning and local regulations,” she said.

Bennet challenges incumbent Democratic Representative Dave Fern, who was in Helena and was unable to attend the forum.

Libertarian for House District 8, Sid Daoud was the only candidate to oppose returning the surplus to taxpayers through a direct refund, which he said would be too costly. Instead, he said any funds left over from paying off the debt should be earmarked for a reduction in property taxes.

Daoud, a member of Kalispell City Council, said it was vital the state weaned itself off property taxes and sought alternative revenue sources such as local option sales taxes.

Daoud called housing his main problem and blamed the cost of construction and the lack of workers for authorized projects not built.

“I know where there’s a whole bunch of construction workers if we look a little bit to our south,” he said.

Daoud said the long-term solution to housing “is to allow the free market to correct itself.”

Daoud’s challenger, Republican Terry Falk, did not attend the forum.

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I’ve paid off student loans, but I support help for those who can’t https://100cskd.com/ive-paid-off-student-loans-but-i-support-help-for-those-who-cant/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 21:56:00 +0000 https://100cskd.com/ive-paid-off-student-loans-but-i-support-help-for-those-who-cant/

In December 2019, my husband submitted his last student loan payment. From the time we got married and started attacking those student loans as a team, it took us 18 months to pay off $51,234.51. Of this debt, $34,134.51 was federal loans and $17,100 was private. There’s not a part of me that blames the millions of Americans who are about to receive $10,000 to $20,000 in student loan relief.

From the outside, it looks like my husband and I “got off the hook” to pay off that debt and heck, if we did, all student borrowers should too. But that’s just not a practical, kind, empathetic, or, frankly, reasonable answer.

When it comes to the “bootstraps” story, it’s important to recognize that my husband and I were collectively earning in the six figures and had no other debt besides his student loans. Granted, we live in one of the most expensive cities in the country, but during this time we still had enough flexibility in our budget to aggressively pay off student loans and live our lives. There was no rice or beans. We still took vacations, went out to dinner, invested in our retirement plans, and had a healthy emergency savings account.

However, this strategy of accelerated earning while balancing a well-balanced life would not have been possible without getting married. Well, that’s not entirely true – I could have helped pay off his debt as an unmarried couple, but I didn’t and I’m not advising anyone to do so. My husband could not have afforded such an aggressive repayment strategy, even living a modest life, on his salary alone, which included overtime. In fact, getting married had a negative impact on her monthly payments.

My husband, like many others with federal student loans, followed an income-based repayment plan, which caps your monthly payments based on a percentage of your discretionary income. This means that those who do not earn a high salary but have large loans will have an affordable payment relative to their income. However, filing a joint tax return meant that my income was factored into the calculation and his minimum monthly payment had increased significantly.

We made the decision to aggressively repay student loans based on what was in our best interests as a family and our sanity. Wiping off his private loan made mathematical sense, but giving up federal student loan debt at a rapid pace didn’t make much sense on paper, especially since my husband was eligible for two different forgiveness programs through his work as a student. ‘teacher. Forgiveness programs, depending on the type, eliminate some or all of the remaining federal student loans after a certain number of services.

If we had chosen not to repay his federal loans aggressively, we could have paid down debt slowly on his income-driven repayment plan, and then we ended up enjoying 2 and a half years of a break on payments during the pandemic that would still have counted towards his pardon eligibility. That would have been thousands of dollars back in our bank account with a credit for the remaining balance canceled – plus the $10,000 relief.

But for me, there are no regrets.

We decided not to pursue forgiveness programs given the restrictions that would have kept my husband’s career in a particular type of waiting pattern for five years to a decade, depending on the program. For example, the civil service forgiveness program requires you to work for a government or non-profit organization for a decade before your loans can be forgiven. This means that if you have the ability or desire to enter the private sector before the end of your ten-year commitment, you will forfeit the ability to have your federal loans forgiven. This is a significant request that could have long-term consequences for someone’s career and potential earnings.

Then, at the start of the pandemic, my income started to hit rock bottom, and it was a huge relief to be at least debt-free at a time when everything seemed so unstable. Once the income issues passed and financial stability returned, I still felt grateful that we were able to get rid of debt anxiety.

Listen, I know some may still have problems – and my anecdotal story probably won’t change your mind – but this is a nuanced problem with no perfect solution. The decision to provide one-time lump-sum relief may be a flawed option, but it will provide a much-needed financial lifeline for many Americans, some of whom did not fully understand the consequences of taking out tens of thousands of dollars in student loans.

Historically, little or no meaningful education was provided to student borrowers. It was simple for people to access thousands of dollars in loans and not fully understand how much interest would accrue or even the true likelihood of gainful employment upon graduation. You could have made an informed decision based on the data and your employment situation might not have resulted in the salary you needed to stay on top of your student loans.

It’s easy to put a 2022 target on this, but I signed up in 2007 – before the financial crisis – and I’m in the middle of millennials. How many millennial seniors were sold a bill about career opportunities and the need for college only to end up being part of the mass layoffs and bottoming job market during the Great Recession? Then, when they finally started to feel some level of respite and financial stability, they were hit in the mouth by the pandemic.

Of course, there is plenty of information and resources available for someone to be proactive and do their own research. But we have to be realistic about whether the average 18-year-old makes rational, practical decisions rather than emotional ones. Even parents can push to go to the most prestigious school, no matter the cost. It’s also frustrating how many people point to “useless degrees” and “fancy schools” as if they’re the only graduates who will get help. It’s not just liberal arts majors who struggle with the burden of student loans. It is also irrational to expect everyone to be a STEM major.

For many, the concern is who will bear the financial burden of this student loan relief. Will it be the average taxpayer who did it to pay off student loans or never even accepted them? It’s unclear right now, and it’s understandable that people are concerned about their own wallets being hit to help someone else. However, there are many ways people’s taxes support systems where they receive little or no benefit personally, but help the community at large.

It’s always been strange to me how a contingent of people feel determined to make those who come behind them struggle in exactly the same way. We all know that life isn’t fair, and some of us will have breaks at certain times in our lives or receive moments of luck that others simply won’t. But it’s a strange phenomenon to want people to struggle just because you had to too. It is also a mistake that the next generation even has the opportunity to follow in the footsteps of its predecessors.

Will there be some of the relieved people who maybe could work harder? Sure. But will millions of Americans have a lifeline who have worked overtime or multiple jobs or had unfortunate situations that cost money? Certainly. Just because some people haven’t “deserved” relief from your personal metric doesn’t mean the many hard-working, struggling people shouldn’t get help.

This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the Editorial Board or of Bloomberg LP and its owners.

Erin Lowry is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering personal finance. She is the author of the three-part “Broke Millennial” series.

More stories like this are available at bloomberg.com/opinion

]]> 3 reasons to spend on a personal loan this year https://100cskd.com/3-reasons-to-spend-on-a-personal-loan-this-year/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 14:00:24 +0000 https://100cskd.com/3-reasons-to-spend-on-a-personal-loan-this-year/

Image source: Getty Images

Now may not be the ideal time to borrow.


Key points

  • A personal loan offers you great flexibility as a borrower.
  • Although personal loan rates are often competitive, you might want to take a different route right now — or avoid borrowing altogether.

There’s a reason so many borrowers are attracted to personal loans. A personal loan lets you borrow money for any purpose, so if you don’t want to be limited in how you use your loan proceeds, this is a good bet.

Plus, you might be able to get a relatively affordable borrowing rate on a personal loan. This especially applies if you have great credit.

But while personal loans certainly have their perks, now might not be the perfect time to get one. Here are some reasons to say no to a personal loan during the latter part of 2022.

Discover: These personal loans are the best for debt consolidation

More: Prequalify for a personal loan without affecting your credit score

1. Borrowing rates are higher

You will generally get a much lower interest rate on the amount you borrow with a personal loan than with a credit card. That said, the Federal Reserve has been aggressively raising interest rates in an effort to slow the pace of inflation. As such, the interest rate you get on a personal loan today may be much higher than what you would have gotten this time last year.

Now the problem is that we don’t know if borrowing is going to get more or less expensive next year. There is reason to believe that the first could occur as rate hikes continue. But if inflation levels start to come down nicely, the Fed could rein in interest rate hikes and borrowing rates could come down in 2023.

At this point, waiting to borrow money is a bit of a gamble. But we know that personal loan rates are higher now than they have been in a while, so that’s something to keep in mind.

2. You don’t need to borrow as much

A great thing about personal loans is that they tend to close quickly. But that doesn’t mean there isn’t work to put one in place. As such, personal lenders tend to impose a minimum borrowing requirement to make this effort worthwhile. And so if you don’t need to borrow a lot of money, a personal loan may not make sense.

Say you need $600. You may find it difficult to get approved for a personal loan under $2,000. In this case, you may want to explore other borrowing options.

3. You have a cheaper choice

A personal loan can be a very affordable borrowing option compared to the other choices presented to you. But if you’re a homeowner, you might be better off taking out a home equity loan if your goal is to get the lowest interest rate possible.

Like personal loans, a home equity loan allows you to use your loan proceeds for any purpose. It’s a big misconception that your proceeds should be used for home improvements or repairs (although many borrowers do, in fact, use home equity loans for this purpose). So you could get the same flexibility at an even lower interest rate.

Taking out a personal loan can be a good solution when you need to borrow money. But for now, you might want to take a different route or, if possible, put borrowing on hold altogether until interest rates start to come down.

The Ascent’s Best Personal Loans for 2022

Our team of independent experts have pored over the fine print to find the select personal loans that offer competitive rates and low fees. Start by reviewing The Ascent’s best personal loans for 2022.

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Legal notice of September 20, 2022 https://100cskd.com/legal-notice-of-september-20-2022/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 08:31:14 +0000 https://100cskd.com/legal-notice-of-september-20-2022/

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Bonner County Zoning Commission will hold a public hearing beginning at 5:30 p.m. on Thursday, October 20, 2022, at the Bonner County Administration Building, 1500 Highway 2, Sandpoint, Idaho , via Zoom teleconference and YouTube Livestream to review the following requests: File ZC0012-22 – Zone Change – Hammond. The plaintiffs request a change of zone from Rural-5 to Rural Service Center on 11.8 acres. The property is zoned Rural-5. The project is located adjacent to Dufort Road and Vay Road in Section 1, Township 55 North, Range 4 West, Boise-Meridian. If you are interested in participating, please visit our website for more details at: https://www.bonnercountyid.gov/departments/Planning/public-hearings Anyone requiring special accommodations to participate in the public hearing must contact the Bonner County Planning Department at (208) 265-1458 at least 48 hours before the hearing. ** Written statements must be filed in the Urban Planning Department’s file no later than seven (7) days before the public hearing. Written statements not exceeding one standard single-spaced, letter-size page may be submitted at the public hearing. Comments can be sent to the Bonner County Planning Department at 1500 Highway 2, Suite 208, Sandpoint, Idaho 83864; faxed to (866) 537-4935 or emailed to planning@bonnercountyid.gov. Additional information is available from the town planning department. Staff reports are available at the Planning Department or can be viewed at www.bonnercountyid.gov prior to the scheduled hearing. Any affected person, as defined by Idaho Code, Title 67, Chapter 65, may appeal to the Board of County Commissions any final determination of the Bonner County Zoning Commission. (Bonner County Revised Code, Section 12-262) Legal#4558 AD#561198 September 20, 2022

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Bonner County Commissioners will hold public hearings at 1:30 p.m. on Wednesday, October 26, 2022, at the Bonner County Administration Building, 1500 Highway 2, Sandpoint, Idaho, by Teleconference Zoom and YouTube Live Stream to review the following applications: File VS0001-22 – Hidden Valley Road – Title 40 Vacation. The petitioner is requesting to vacate a portion of Hidden Valley Road, a public right of way, under Title 40 of the Idaho Code. The property is zoned Agricultural/Forestry 20. The project is located near Pinehaven Road in Section 12, Township 54 North, Range 5 West, Boise-Meridian. File VS0002-22 – Harris Avenue – Title 40 Vacation. The petitioners are asking to vacate a portion of Harris Avenue, a public right of way, under Title 40 of the Idaho Code. The property is zoned Suburb. The project is located near Highway 41 in Section 25, Township 56 North, Range 6 West, Boise-Meridian. If you are interested in participating, please visit our website for more details at: https://www.bonnercountyid.gov/departments/Planning/public-hearings Anyone requiring special accommodations to participate in the public hearing must contact the Bonner County Planning Department at (208) 265-1458 at least 48 hours before the hearing. ** Written statements must be filed in the Urban Planning Department’s file no later than seven (7) days before the public hearing. Written statements not exceeding one standard single-spaced, letter-size page may be submitted at the public hearing. Comments can be sent to the Bonner County Planning Department at 1500 Highway 2, Suite 208, Sandpoint, Idaho 83864; faxed to (866) 537-4935 or emailed to planning@bonnercountyid.gov. Additional information is available from the town planning department. Staff reports are available at the Planning Department or can be viewed at www.bonnercountyid.gov prior to the scheduled hearing. Any Affected Person as defined by the Idaho Code, Title 67, Chapter 65, may apply to the Board of County Commissions for reconsideration of any final determination of the Board of County Commissions. (Bonner County Revised Code, Section 12-263) Legal#4559 AD#561219 September 20, October 27, 4, 2022

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Bonner County Hearing Examiner will hold a public hearing beginning at 1:30 p.m. on Wednesday, October 5, 2022, at the Bonner County Administration Building, 1500 Highway 2, Sandpoint, Idaho, via Zoom teleconference and YouTube Livestream to consider the following requests: File V0012-22 – Variance – Property Line Setback. The applicant is requesting a setback from the 2’11” property line where 5 feet is required. The parcel is zoned Recreation (Rec). The project is located off Whiskey Jack Cr in Section 07, Township 57N, Range 1W , Boise-Meridian If you would like to participate, please visit our website for details at: https://www.bonnercountyid.gov/departments/Planning/public-hearings Anyone requiring accommodations specials to participate in the public hearing must contact the Bonner County Planning Department at (208) 265-1458 at least 48 hours prior to the hearing.** Written statements must be placed on file with the Planning Department at no later than seven (7) days before the public hearing Written statements not exceeding one standard letter-size, single-spaced page Comments may be sent to the Bonner County Planning Department at 1500 Highway 2, Suite 208 , Sandpoint, Idaho 83864, by fa x at (866) 537-4935 or by email at planning@bonnercountyid.gov. Additional information is available from the Planning Department. Staff reports are available at the Planning Department or can be viewed at www.bonnercountyid.gov prior to the scheduled hearing. Any affected person, as defined by Idaho Code, Title 67, Chapter 65, may appeal to the Board of County Commissions any final determination of the Bonner County Hearing Examiner. (Bonner County Revised Code, Section 12-262) Legal#4560 AD#561295 September 20, 2022

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CANCELED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Bonner County Commissioners will hold public hearings at 1:30 p.m. on Wednesday, September 21, 2022, at the Bonner County Administration Building, 1500 Highway 2, Sandpoint, Idaho, via Zoom teleconference, and YouTube Livestream to consider the following requests: file AM0007-22, text modification and adoption of the map. The county is requesting an update to BCRC 12-310, 12-311, 12-312, and 12-313 updating Bonner County Area Map Maintenance Procedures. This change moves the official zone map to digital format on the county website in accordance with technology upgrades. This includes the adoption of a new zone map showing all changes that have been approved by ordinance since 2010. If you are interested in participating, please visit our website for details at: https:// www.bonnercountyid.gov/departments/Planning/public-hearings Anyone requiring special accommodations to participate in the public hearing should contact the Bonner County Planning Department at (208) 265-1458 at least 48 hours prior the hearing. ** Written statements must be filed in the Urban Planning Department’s file no later than seven (7) days before the public hearing. Written statements not exceeding one standard single-spaced, letter-size page may be submitted at the public hearing. Comments can be sent to the Bonner County Planning Department at 1500 Highway 2, Suite 208, Sandpoint, Idaho 83864; faxed to (866) 537-4935 or emailed to planning@bonnercountyid.gov. Additional information is available from the town planning department. Staff reports are available at the Planning Department or can be viewed at www.bonnercountyid.gov prior to the scheduled hearing. Any Affected Person as defined by the Idaho Code, Title 67, Chapter 65, may apply to the Board of County Commissions for reconsideration of any final determination of the Board of County Commissions. (Bonner County Revised Code, Section 12-263) Legal#4563 AD#561618 September 20, 2022

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Bonner County Commissioners will hold a public hearing at 1:30 p.m. on Wednesday, October 12, 2022, at the Bonner County Administration Building, 1500 Highway 2, Sandpoint, Idaho, by Zoom teleconference, and YouTube Livestream to consider the following requests: file AM0007-22, text modification and adoption of the map. The county is requesting an update to BCRC 12-310, 12-311, 12-312, and 12-313 updating Bonner County Area Map Maintenance Procedures. This change moves the official zone map to digital format on the county website in accordance with technology upgrades. This includes the adoption of a new zone map showing all changes that have been approved by ordinance since 2010. If you are interested in participating, please visit our website for details at: https:// www.bonnercountyid.gov/departments/Planning/public-hearings Anyone requiring special accommodations to participate in the public hearing should contact the Bonner County Planning Department at (208) 265-1458 at least 48 hours prior the hearing. ** Written statements must be filed in the Urban Planning Department’s file no later than seven (7) days before the public hearing. Written statements not exceeding one standard single-spaced, letter-size page may be submitted at the public hearing. Comments can be sent to the Bonner County Planning Department at 1500 Highway 2, Suite 208, Sandpoint, Idaho 83864; faxed to (866) 537-4935 or emailed to planning@bonnercountyid.gov. Additional information is available from the town planning department. Staff reports are available at the Planning Department or can be viewed at www.bonnercountyid.gov prior to the scheduled hearing. Any Affected Person as defined by the Idaho Code, Title 67, Chapter 65, may apply to the Board of County Commissions for reconsideration of any final determination of the Board of County Commissions. (Bonner County Revised Code, Section 12-263) Legal#4566 AD#561748 September 20, 2022

BUDGET FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 2022-2023 SELKIRKS PENDANT TRANSIT AUTHORITY Copies of the detailed budget are available from the SPOT office located at 31656 Hwy 200, Suite 102, Ponderay, ID during normal business hours. 2020/2021 2021/2022 2022/2023 FUND NAME Actual Approved Budget Approved Budget EXPENDITURES General Fund $796,366 $1,027,945 $1,289,015 Capital Expenses 43,872 615,000 356,696 TOTAL EXPENDITURES $840,238 $1,642,945 $1,645,711 REVENUES General Revenue $834,673 $1,041,654 $1,175,595 Capital Revenue 19,497 492,000 285,357 Capital Match Carry Over 24,374 123,000 71,339 Cash carried forward -38,306 -13,709 113,420 TOTAL REVENUES $840,238 $1,642,945 $1,645,711 Citizens are invited to consult the detailed supporting documents for the approved budget above. Zale Palmer Treasurer Legal#4564 AD#561679 September 20, 2022

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